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Increasing national burden of hospitalizations for skin and soft tissue infections in children

  • Timothy B. Lautz
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 773 880 4912; fax: +1 773 880 4588.
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60614, USA
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  • Mehul V. Raval
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60614, USA

    Division of Research and Optimal Patient Care, American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL 60614, USA
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  • Katherine A. Barsness
    Affiliations
    Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60614, USA
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      Abstract

      Background

      The number of children requiring treatment of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) has increased since the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

      Methods

      The 2000, 2003, and 2006 Kids' Inpatient Databases were queried for patients with a primary diagnosis of SSTI. Weighted data were analyzed to estimate temporal changes in incidence, incision and drainage (I&D) rate, and economic burden. Factors associated with I&D were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression.

      Results

      Pediatric SSTI admissions increased (1) in number, (2) as a fraction of all hospital admissions, and (3) in incidence per 100,000 children from the years 2000 (17,525 ± 838; 0.65%; 23.2) to 2003 (27,463 ± 1652; 0.99%; 36.2) and 2006 (48,228 ± 2223; 1.77%; 62.7). Children younger than 3 years accounted for 49.6% of SSTI admissions in 2006, up from 32.5% in 2000. Utilization of I&D increased during the study period from 26.0% to 43.8%. Factors most associated with requiring I&D were age less than 3 years and calendar year 2006 (both P < .001). Hospital costs per patient increased over time and were higher in the group of patients who required I&D ($4296 ± $84 vs $3521 ± $81; P < .001; year 2006). Aggregate national costs reached $184.0 ± $9.4 million in 2006.

      Conclusion

      The recent spike in pediatric SSTIs has disproportionately affected children younger than 3 years, and an increasing fraction of these children require I&D. The national economic burden is substantial.

      Key words

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